Jump to content

[TOPIC: topicViewTemplate]
[GLOBAL: userSmallPhoto]
Photo

Just a little question about Japanese
Started by ulydev5 Apr 22 2014 09:21 AM

4 replies to this topic
[TOPIC CONTROLS]
This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
[/TOPIC CONTROLS]
[modOptionsDropdown]
[/modOptionsDropdown]
[reputationFilter]
[TOPIC: post.html]
#1

ulydev5

[GLOBAL: userInfoPane.html]
ulydev5
  • Enthusiast

  • 87 posts
  • Enterprise

こんばんは !

 

I started studying Japanese a few days ago. This is a beautiful language and I really want to be able to handle a conversation in Japanese, and maybe live in Japan.

 

However I've got a little question about it : Why do we use three different alphabets ? When do we use Kanjis, when do we use Hiraganas, when do we use Katakanas ? I'm really lost.

 

どうもありがとうございます !



[TOPIC: post.html]
#2

Naomi

[GLOBAL: userInfoPane.html]
Naomi
  • Corona Geek

  • 2,303 posts
  • Corona SDK

In my opinion, you use Kanji whenever you like and wherever you can -- which means, most people use it when they know the right kanji characters for the word.  Only exception to this rule might be stylistic or for ease.  By ease, I mean to make it easier to read for specific readers/audience.

 

As for Katakana, you use it for a word that is not originally Japanese.  For example, アメリカ is not a Japanese word but an imported word that sounds like "America", while 米国 doesn't sound anything like America but it refers to the USA.  合衆国 means United States but doesn't sound anything like United States either.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Naomi



[TOPIC: post.html]
#3

ulydev5

[GLOBAL: userInfoPane.html]
ulydev5
  • Enthusiast

  • 87 posts
  • Enterprise

Thanks you very much ! It's much clearer now.

 

I have one last question though : Are Japanese Kanjis the same as Chinese Kanjis ? Because (日本語) which I believe means "Japanese" also means "Japanese" in Chinese (I'm studying it too). If so, it may be really easier for me as I wouldn't have to learn another alphabet (excepted Katakana and Hiragana).

 

Ulysse



[TOPIC: post.html]
#4

Naomi

[GLOBAL: userInfoPane.html]
Naomi
  • Corona Geek

  • 2,303 posts
  • Corona SDK

日本語 means Japanese (language) while 日本人 means Japanese (people).

 

Kanjis are Chinese characters that were imported from China way back when, enriching Japanese language.  After it was brought over, some of the Kanji characters evolved (modified or simplified), and that means not all Kanjis look the same as the original Chinese characters.

 

I have not studied/learned Chinese, and I'm only guessing, but it's probably safe to think that Kanjis have the same (or at least similar) meaning as their original Chinese characters. 

 

Naomi



[TOPIC: post.html]
#5

ulydev5

[GLOBAL: userInfoPane.html]
ulydev5
  • Enthusiast

  • 87 posts
  • Enterprise

Thanks you very much for all these explanations and for your time.

Ulysse




[topic_controls]
[/topic_controls]